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Peas

Peas do best in near neutral pH or above.

Peas can be put into 2 categories. The first known as a Field Pea is a cool season or spring planted product. The second, Cowpeas is a warm season, summer planted pea.

Description

Not only are peas an excellent source of nitrogen, but they also offer additional tonnage and crude protein in the harvested forage.

Management

Peas do best in near neutral pH or above, in well drained soils and moderate fertility.

Establishment

Plant in moist soils, usually 1-3 inches in depth. This also insures better anchoring for the plant to avoid lodging. Planting with a small grain will give the pea the opportunity to crawl up the oat stem for better standability.

Field Peas

Description

Field peas are excellent nitrogen fixers and establish quickly, providing good ground cover. Peas are usually mixed with oats, barley, or triticale and are an excellent source of high protein forage. Field peas are divided into two types. The Austrian winter pea can be planted in the fall and usually overwinters south of Interstate 70. The other peas, like the Arvika spring pea, do best planted as early as you can get into the field in the spring.

Management

Peas like cool weather and languish in heat and drought. Peas like a wide variety of well drained soils. They are almost always planted with small grains such as oats and are usually used as a dual purpose cover and forage crop. Inoculate to ensure good nitrogen production.

Establishment

Plant peas 1 inch deep at a rate of 30-100 lbs/A depending on the mix. If nitrogen and protein are the goal, plant more peas than small grains. Plant fall peas by mid-August to mid-September; peas need to be 4-6 inches tall before going dormant for the winter. Plant spring peas as soon as you are able to work the fields. Expect peas to grow rapidly in the spring and ready for harvest or incorporation in about 60 days.

Arvika Peas
Information Sheets

Description:

  • Rapid spring growth
  • Plant as early as you can get in the field
  • Produces over 100 lbs nitrogen
  • Excellent forage
  • Not suited for fall planting
Zones: 1,2,3,4,5,6
Flex Peas
Information Sheets

Description:

Flex peas are a cross between winter and spring pea not suited for fall planting. White flowered for better palatability, flex peas put on massive tonnage right at flowering.

  • Superior growth characteristics
  • Very good tolerance to frost
  • White-flowered which means fewer hard seeds than purple-flowered peas
  • Very Palatable
Zones: 1,2,3,4
Austrian Winter Peas
Information Sheets

Description:

  • Adds valuable protein to Livestock diets
  • Works well with fall planted triticale and other small grains
  • Works well ahead of corn or other early spring planted crops
Zones: 1,2,3,4
Windham Winter Peas
Information Sheets

Description:

  • Improved variety
  • The only winter pea with enough winter hardiness for central to upper Midwest
  • Great for mixing with small grains
  • Can produce 4000-6000 lbs biomass
Zones: 4,5,6
4010 Peas Organic
Information Sheets

Description:

4010 Peas are a taller forage pea which provide a lush and nutritious silage when cut at boot stage. They are most commonly mixed with forage oats or triticale. Seeded as a monoculture the rate is 100 -120 lbs/acre. Mixed with a small grain, typical mixtures are small grain 50-70% and peas 30% to 50%.

  • Available in Certified Organic form
  • High protein forage many times used to raise the protein of a small grain silage
  • Extra tonnage due to their height
Zones: 1,2,3,4
Admiral Peas
Information Sheets

Description:

This new pea bred especially for grain can also be used for forage. Admiral peas are a good, digestible protein source for livestock and are easier to grow than soybeans in Organic systems.

  • Very good grain pea
  • Can be used as a forage as well
  • Easy to establish
  • Works better than soybeans in an organic system
Zones: 1,2,3,4